Posts tagged ‘cardigan’

DIP-a-dee-doo-dah

So here’s my DIP! (Design In Progress)

Have I mentioned I’m madly in love with Liberty Wool? I know, I know, like every time I knit with it. It is an absolute pleasure to work with. I feel like I knit so much faster when I’m using it. You know, lots of people talk about how cotton hurts their hands, because it doesn’t have any give. And I never really got it, until this project I never really noticed the difference in fibers in how comfortable my knitting was. But I am just loving the squishy elasticity in this yarn. It is to die for. I still don’t think cotton is uncomfortable, but this liberty wool is not only comfortable, it’s downright luxurious to work with. And it’s just a simple superwash!

The milestones on this project are flying by. Finished the back, and the left front, I’m making serious progress on the right front, and then I’ll only have the sleeves… but the sleeves are tricky because I haven’t done the first bit of math on them. So that could present some interesting issues. My goal is to have the front finished by the end of the week so I can spend next week on sleeves, both designing and knitting. 🙂

I have two other ideas on the back burner that I’m mulling over as I work on this project. But I do attempt to be a monogamous designer, so I’m plowing through this sweater so I can get started on all this other stuff that’s capturing my inspiration.

July 12, 2012 at 12:29 pm Leave a comment

Knitterly Musings on a Hot Afternoon

I started to write this “quick” blog post on Saturday, and it just kept going… and going… and going… Apparently I had a lot on my mind.

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It’s like a million degrees outside. We’re totally paying for the glorious lack of nasty winter by getting one heck of a summer. I’m pretty sure we just broke the all-time record yesterday. So as I brew some sweet tea for my husband who’s a glutton for punishment and is mowing, weed-eating and doing all sort of other things that a sane person would not do on a day like today, I almost picked up one of my wool projects. What has been keeping me from doing so is actually not the insane temperature. It’s actually more about the knitting that’s making me stand-offish when I look at them sitting there in their unfinished state, begging to be the subject of my unwind in silence time.

Right now I’m actively working on two projects. One for the kids and one for me. For the kids, you may recall, I’m trying to tackle the question of wool cloth diapering. My first attempt was a success with a few reservations and I’m tackling the improvements by way of double knitting. Problem. I’ve never done any double knitting. And while this has never posed much of a problem to me in the past when picking up a new technique, it’s become a problem now. Usually, if I hear a podcast or read a blog on the topic, I can  pick up a new technique in a matter of minutes. I may need a youtube or two to help me perfect my execution of it, but generally, I just learn it and quickly and easily incorporate it into whatever I’m working on at the time. Double knitting has not worked out like that. I honestly feel like I’m learning to knit all over again. I hold the yarn so awkwardly, I’m constantly trying to figure out if my yarn should be in front or in back. I can barely figure out if I’m on a knit or a purl stitch. After working on my diaper cover for over two hours, I have like 4-5 rows to show for it.

Part of my problem.. Did I knit a little practice swatch to teach me the basics before casting on a whole project? Of course not! Why would I do a sensible thing like that? Oh no, I decided to jump right in on my next cover with a new cast on, double-knit ribbing, and of course double-knit stockinette. What can I say? I love a challenge. I actually have figured out a bit of a rhythm, and while I’m unconvinced about the success of the project, I am learning a new technique which is never a waste of time.

In all my clumsy fiddling with the ribbed section of this cover, I must say I loved learning the cast-on. Turns out it’s actually not that hard if you’re already a fan of the long-tail cast-on, which I am. It also has one big advantage, you don’t just have to use it for double knitting. When you’re double knitting, you’re constructing two separate pieces of stockinette knitted fabric simultaneously Usually they are connected, but don’t have to be. Some knitters actually work two socks or sleeves at the same time with this technique. Cool? Yes! Awkward to work when first learning? Very! But since usually those two pieces of fabric have the wrong side of both facing “in”, so that you have a piece of double sided stockinette, you are essentially working a 1×1 ribbed pattern, working all the purls with one yarn and all the knits with another. All that means that while yes, you could just use your normal long-tail cast on, it really isn’t very elegant and doesn’t integrate with the fabric well. A ribbed two color cast on of some kind is required. Enter that tutorial on Twist Collective I linked to the other day. When I watched the little video, I had a eureka moment. Why hadn’t I figured this out before? It’s so simple! I’d heard rumors that the long-tail cast on is reversible, but I never figured it out, I probably just wasn’t trying, and was a little to lazy to care. With this cast on, you take your two strands, make a slip knot as usual and place it on the needle. Then you use the two strands as if one was your working yarn and one was the long tail. Brilliant! I’ve used this cast-on before for stranded knitting and it looks great. But this little cast on went the extra mile and incorporated the reversed long-tail cast on for the purl stitches. Something I really wish I had picked up a long time ago.

This is all very cool, but let’s just say that the awkwardness just makes it not much of a relaxing project right now. So what about the project for me?

Well, as you may recall from a month ago. I’m working on this cute little black cardi for the fall. It’s actually going really well, except for my indecisiveness. There are a couple design elements that I just keep second guessing, so I hate keep working on it when there is a possibility that I’m just going to have to rip things out again. There’s this waist band that I can’t decide if I should keep or not. I think I’ve finally decided that the answer is “no”. It looks pretty cool, but if there’s anything I can’t stand it’s an overworked knitwear design. (Ascending soap box now). We know the story… you go to the store and see all these cute sweaters, they’re super simple from a knitting technique perspective, but oh, so fashionable, and you go “wow, I could totally make that and it would look 10 times cuter”, and you’d be right. So you go home, sketch out a simple raglan sweater, or whatever it was, do a bit of math and before you know it, you’re really close to reproducing that cute sweater. But then you go… “hmm, I’d love to add a lace motif”, or “it could really use some cables” and before you know it, your design is way overworked. If you do happen to finish it, the final product is a fine tribute to your knitting skills and a bit of a detractor to your fashion sense. Knitters (me included) have this irritating habit of putting their knitting before their fashion. And that my friends, should not be. It really takes away from our skill if the final product is beautiful only to the eye of it’s creator, and seen by others as at best eccentric, and at worst downright ugly. (Ok, soapbox rant over). So all that to say, I really felt like the waist band was going up the overworked knitwear path a bit too much. I did a quick mental survey of the cute layering cardigans I’ve owned or admired, and none of them had the contemplated waistband, so that makes it a no go. So now that that’s decided I think I have some knitting to rip out.

Break out the sweet tea.

July 2, 2012 at 8:09 am Leave a comment

A Little Process Knitting

Over the last few days, I have been craving a new knitting project. It’s not so much a case of startitis, so much as a desperate desire to engage my mind intellectually and relax physically. Some serious process knitting was in order. A good sized project with an interesting stitch pattern. In the middle of all the infant care, I’ve just needed to claim my brain as my own. To remember I’m still the same person, even if life looks very, very different.

I was going to start a new project, some sort of cottony, beachy cardi. But when I started swatching, I reallized I just did not have the brain cells to design a brand new sweater. Then a litle lesson I learned two years ago jumped into my little head. Two Mays ago, I started a gorgeous alpaca pullover, I worked on it all summer, and come september, I had a beautiful sweater all ready to go. I didn’t repeat the tradition last year and really missed it when the fall came around.

So I decided to skip the beachy sweater idea, and finish the black cardi I started last fall.

image

A huge chunk of the design work was already done and I’ve been dying to make myself a normal wear-with-everything black cardi for about 3 years.

image

The timing was perfect.

May 21, 2012 at 3:05 pm 1 comment

Work in Progress: The Perfect Cardi

Ever since I’ve gotten into knitting , I’ve wanted a perfect, basic, black cardigan. When I first started working with Liberty Wool by Classic Elite last year, I knew I had to make myself a cardi out of it. A couple months ago, I started this…

The picture makes the black a tad washed out, but the yarn is a beautiful jet black with incredible stitch definition.

I put it down for a while to work on a couple other projects, but then just picked it up again. I’ve wanted this sweater for a couple years and with babies coming in March or April, it’s probably the last big thing I’ll knit for me in a while.

I’m loving the stitch pattern, it’s a slip stitch pattern that resembles a cable, but has a much more squishy texture than most cable patterns.

I am having a bit of difficulty in designing the sleeve caps. I feel like a set-in sleeve is the most flattering sleeve design on women’s garments, especially if you like a more tailored look, like I do. But in my opinion, it happens to be the most finicky to calculate compared with raglan and yoke shaping, especially since these can be done top down and seamlessly. Yes, I know there are ways to do a set in sleeve top down and seamlessly, but from the last two sweaters I’ve used those methods on, I’ve found you can’t really get the exact same effect as when it’s done in pieces. As I get more experience, I may change my mind. But this sweater definitely required the structure and precision that you get when working in pieces. I spent most of the weekend wrestling with math and trying to get my sleeve caps to make sense, but that math I normally use to design a sleeve cap just wasn’t working for me. I finally figured out the problem. Gauge. Isn’t that always the way? This time it wasn’t really an error, so much as realizing once again why gauge matters. This ribbed “cable” stitch had completely different stitch to row proportions than normal stockinette, making the math I normally use completely useless. I could have messed around and figured something else out, but I decided to call in an expert.

Shirley Paden’s Knitwear Design Workshop.

The cheapskate in me rarely, rarely buys knitting books. If it isn’t yarn or needles, or maybe a pattern, I feel like I’m being extravagant, because I’m not directly contributing to a final project. Which is just a silly perspective. But I actually did it, I put in an order to amazon right then. I hope to get it sometime this week. I’m really excited about getting a bit more educated on the ins and outs of how to design a garments structure from scratch. I’ve learned a lot from experience, blogs and podcasts, and patterns. But it’s just been a little here and a little there. I feel like this will be a much more comprehensive approach that will add quite a bit of polish to my designs.

Well, I’ll give a more complete review when I’ve actually gotten a chance to dig into the book a bit more.

In the mean time it’s back to knitting, I haven’t even started the sleeves yet!

January 2, 2012 at 1:02 pm 3 comments

Introducing the Grey Goose Cardi

I’ve been looking forward to writing this post for some time. But that day is finally here. I’ve been talking a lot about Berroco Glint for the last few months, and now, may I introduce to you the sweater that shows of this yarn so beautifully, Grey Goose Cardi.

I’ve really wanted an elegant, drapy cardigan ever since I first saw them everywhere. When I clapped my eyes on Berroco Glint, the match was made. This is a wonderfully drapy yarn and the little bit of metallic gives it such an elegant look. It’s an incredibly versatile cardigan, that will add some spice to your wardrobe throughout the year. The top down construction and all over stockinette pattern makes it a super quick knit.

Sizes – 30 (34, 38, 42) (46, 50,54)” Bust
Sample size: 34” shown on a 34” bust. Suggested ease: 0”, If you are between sizes, choose the smaller size.

Required Materials:
• 8 (9, 11, 13) (15, 17, 19) skeins of Berroco Glint (80% cotton, 12% nylon, 8% metallic) – 141 yd / 50g. Colorway: Goddess
• Size US 6/4.00mm 42” circular needle, or whatever size is required to get gauge
• Size US 6/4.00mm 24” circular needle, or whatever size is required to get gauge
• 5 stitch markers
• Tapestry Needle

Gauge – 22 sts x 26 rows over 4” / 10cm in Stockinette stitch with #6 needles, block before checking gauge

Skills Required:
• Knit and purl
• Increasing between stitches
• Provisional cast on
• Binding off
• Short rows

November 8, 2011 at 4:46 pm Leave a comment

Elegant Economy Spring 2011 Runway: Day 1

It is with great pleasure and anticipation that I introduce my collection of spring knitwear!

Today I introduce the Crossover Cardi.

This sleeveless cardigan was designed give you a fashionable extra layer during those days that don’t seem as springy as they should. It is pictured above with a knitted tie, giving it a tailored and clean cut look. It can also be worn without the tie and secured with a simple shawl pin to create a more relaxed look.

The entire garment is knit in one octagonal shaped piece with only a single seam. The dramatic collar is created when the upper side of the octagon is folded over the shoulders. The body is primarily stockinette, but the interesting shape of the garment and the reversible cabled border make it a fascinating project for the knitter who is far too easily bored.

It is knit up in Berroco Remix, a yarn I’ve fallen madly in love with for fall and spring knitting. For one, it’s completely recycled, which just makes me happy to know I’m helping to steward the earth’s resources well. Secondly, the fiber blend is unusual but wonderful. Cotton, acrylic, silk, nylon and linen combine to create a worsted weight yarn that adds warmth without feeling overly bundled up and wintery, which is exactly what you want this time of year. At $10/100g ball, it’s reasonably priced for the fiber content, and is knit up into this cardigan which is a remarkably versatile addition to your spring wardrobe.

Gauge – 12 sts x 16 rows/3 inches

Sizes – (x-small, small, medium, large) (x-large, 2x-large, 3x-large)

Finished Garment Size at Bust – (31.5, 34.5, 37, 41.75) (44.25, 46.75, 50) inches. This cardigan is designed to have 1-3 inches of ease. However, due to the wrapped nature of the garment the fit is flexible and can be wrapped a bit looser or tighter to fit the wearers taste.

Required Materials –

  • Berrocco Remix – (4, 5, 5, 7)(7, 8, 9) balls or (750, 950, 1050) (1325, 1425, 1675, 1900) yards. (216yd/198m to 100g/3.53oz. 30% Nylon, 27% Cotton, 24% Acrylic, 10% Silk. Color: 2967 Bittersweet)
  • #8 US or 5mm, 40” circular needle
  • #8 US or 5mm DPNs (you can use the 40” circular needle and use the magic loop method if you prefer)
  • Additional #8 US or 5mm circular needle or straight needle
  • One #9 US or 5.5mm DPN or straight needle
  • Knitting Needle point protectors, or cap for the cable if using interchangeable needles
  • 8-15 stitch markers
  • Cable needle
  • 2-3 Size 10 snaps
  • Tapestry needle

$6.00

I hope to see you all back here tomorrow for details on the next installment of the Spring 2011 collection.

P.S. I will be announcing the faithful followers giveaway winner on friday.

April 4, 2011 at 9:30 am Leave a comment


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